Happy Thanksgiving!

Turkey day is nearly upon us. And like many, I’ve been more reflective this week of the things I’m thankful for. But I have to ask: why do we only focus our energy looking for the positive one day a year? Did you know there are many benefits to being thankful each and every day?

I’ve been reading The Happiness Advantage by Shawn Achor, a Harvard psychologist who studies happiness. It turns out that happy people are more successful. This is in contrast to the conclusion many of us make, which is that successful people are more happy.

So why does happiness lead to success? People who are happier have an advantage when it comes to assessing new situations. They look for the good, and often see opportunities that are missed by the more pessimistic among us. Our brains get very good at spotting patterns. So if you always look for the worst in every situation, your brain will skip right over a possible advantage. But the good news is happiness can be learned. If you want to teach your brain to find good things, look for good things in your every day life. One recommendation the author makes is to name three things you are happy about (or grateful for) every day, no matter how small. Today I am grateful for:

  1. Coffee with heavy cream.
  2. My kids making each other laugh over breakfast.
  3. Getting to talk with my mom on the phone.

So why wait until Thursday? Start right now and leave me a message in the comments: What are you thankful for?

 

Happy Thanksgiving!

Related Articles:

Disclaimer: This webpage is for general information only. It is not intended to diagnose or treat any medical illness, or give any specific medical advice. Because medical knowlege is constantly evolving, I cannot guarantee the accuracy or timeliness of any information in this blog.

Why did I become a Plastic Surgeon?

If you ever wanted to know why I went into Plastic Surgery, here is your answer! And you actually get to see what I look like and sound like.

 

If you’d like to see more from us at Greer Plastic Surgery, please subscribe to my blog, or check out my website at www.greerplastics.com.

You can also reach us directly at (4400 974-8577.

Related Articles:

Disclaimer: This webpage is for general information only. It is not intended to diagnose or treat any medical illness, or give any specific medical advice. Because medical knowlege is constantly evolving, I cannot guarantee the accuracy or timeliness of any information in this blog.

What is the difference between Botox and fillers?

I perform many minimally-invasive procedures to treat wrinkles in my office, and I’ve noticed that there is often a lot of confusion about exactly what the difference is between a neurotoxin such as BOTOX, and a filler such as Juvederm or Restylane. My blog post today is written with the intent of clearing up that confusion.

Confusion is understandable, as the two treatments do share many similarities. Both neurotoxins and fillers are injected in the office. Both treat wrinkles. And both are temporary, meaning the results wear off over time. But the two products actually work quite differently.

As I mentioned before, Botox is a neurotoxin. This means it is actually toxic to nerves, thereby preventing muscles from contracting in the areas where it is injected. Muscle contraction is responsible for what are called “dynamic wrinkles”, i.e. wrinkles resulting from motion. Dynamic wrinkles are commonly seen between the eyebrows, over the forehead, and around the eyes. Preventing the muscles from moving stops the wrinkle from forming. Because neurotoxins cause localized muscle paralysis, I do not like to use them around the mouth as this may result in drooling or difficulty speaking and eating.

Fillers do what their name implies: they fill volume. Volume loss in the soft tissues contributes to an aging appearance. This is partially responsible for the formation of the “smile lines” which run from the nose to the corner of the mouth, and the marionette lines which run from the corner of the mouth to the chin. Ptosis or droopiness of the overlying tissue secondary to gravity is the other main contributing factor, and this can be corrected surgically. But adding volume directly under a wrinkle can significantly soften the appearance. Unlike neurotoxins, which require several days to take effect, the results from fillers are immediate.

If you’d like to learn more, check out my previous posts on Botox and other neurotoxins as well as fillers.

Any questions? Leave a comment and I’ll do my best to get back to you.

Related Articles:

Disclaimer: This webpage is for general information only. It is not intended to diagnose or treat any medical illness, or give any specific medical advice. Because medical knowlege is constantly evolving, I cannot guarantee the accuracy or timeliness of any information in this blog.

What if my family doesn’t want me to have Plastic Surgery?

Having Plastic Surgery is a big decision, and it is common for families to want to weigh in on the topic. But what do you do if your family is against you having surgery? This is actually a scenario that I see a few times a year. Before I delve in to how I help patients through this type of situation, let’s talk first about the financial aspect. Cosmetic surgery can be expensive. If your family or spouse doesn’t support your decision because they don’t think you as a family can afford it, you need to approach this like you would any big budget decision. Finances affect the entire family, so this is definitely an area where you and your spouse need to be in agreement. But if you’re single, and you are responsible for your own finances, it really doesn’t matter what other people (e.g. your grown children, friends, you parents) think. Your finances are your decision.shutterstock_325360154

With that out of the way, there are two other common objections that I see family and friends make.

  1. They worry about your health and safety. Whether you are medically a good candidate for surgery is a decision that should be made by your surgeon, possibly with input from your primary care physician. I have had family members tell me that they don’t think their mother or father is medically healthy enough to have surgery, but when I review the patient’s medical history, there is actually nothing concerning that would increase the risks of surgery. The only thing you can do here is to reassure your family that your doctor thinks you are medically healthy enough to have surgery. Seeing your family doctor for additional input may put your family’s mind at east, as this information would be coming from a trusted and known source, rather than a doctor you’ve just met.
  2. They don’t think you need surgery. This objection comes up quite frequently. And this isn’t really surprising, because it’s a value judgement. If something bothers you, that is all that is important. Now granted, people do sometimes obsess over an area of the body that actually needs minimal improvement. And this is where your surgeon’s judgement is important. If I think that I can make a visible improvement that will make a patient happier, then I recommend surgery. But if I think that no improvement is possible or that the patient won’t be happy regardless of the results, that is not a patient I offer surgery to.

To summarize, the financial aspect of surgery is a decision that should be made as a team if you are married or otherwise share finances with someone. But if finances are solely your decision, then the opinions of other family and friends don’t matter. The other aspects of the decision to have surgery are 1) whether you are medically healthy enough, and 2) whether you’ll be able to achieve the results you want. Those parts of the decision should be made in collaboration with your surgeon and your primary care physician.

Related Articles:

Disclaimer: This webpage is for general information only. It is not intended to diagnose or treat any medical illness, or give any specific medical advice. Because medical knowlege is constantly evolving, I cannot guarantee the accuracy or timeliness of any information in this blog.

Are medical-grade skin care products really better?

Yes! There is absolutely a difference between the skin care products offered over the counter and skin care products sold by physicians.glowing skin

  • The products sold in doctor’s offices contain higher concentrations of active ingredients, meaning they are generally more effective. Treatments for brown spots are a great example. The skin lightening creams available at your local pharmacy contain 2% hydroquinone, the active ingredient which blocks your cells from making pigment. But skin lightening creams available through your Plastic Surgeon have 4% hydroquinone.
  • When you see a Plastic Surgeon or a Dermatologist for skin care products you get the benefit of a skin care plan tailored to your needs. A skin care product may be incredibly effective, but it won’t help you if you’re using it for the wrong reason. Along those same lines, a physician can diagnose what is really going on with your skin, and treat the underlying cause, not just the symptoms.
  • Sometimes your skin takes time to adjust to new products. A doctor can tell you if what you are experiencing is a normal side effect, or if you should stop the product or try a different product instead. Tretinoin (aka Retin A) cream is a great example of this. Tretinoin is very irritating to the skin, so many people stop using it before they see results. But Tretinoin can give some amazing results in terms of smoothing fine lines and evening out pigmentation, if you are able to get through that adjustment period. A doctor experienced with skin care can help you adjust your use to minimize skin irritation, or even prescribe other products to calm down the initial redness and flaking.
  • Plastic Surgeons can also recommend where best to spend your money if you have a limited budget.  Skin care products are a way to help augment the results I achieve from laser procedures, Botox, and fillers. Which means I care about your results, not making a commission. I can tell you which skin care products to purchase at your local pharmacy to save you money, and which ones you really need to buy at my office to see results.

Do you have a question about skin care products? I would love to answer them in the comments section!

Related Articles:

Disclaimer: This webpage is for general information only. It is not intended to diagnose or treat any medical illness, or give any specific medical advice. Because medical knowlege is constantly evolving, I cannot guarantee the accuracy or timeliness of any information in this blog.