About Greer

Dr. Greer is a native of the midwest. After earning a Bachelor’s at the University of Chicago, she received her medical degree at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. While at Case, she also earned a Master’s degree in Biomedical Ethics. She did her Plastic Surgery training at Saint Louis University Hospital, in St. Louis, MO, and returned to the greater Cleveland area to set up practice in general Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery.

Happy Thanksgiving!

Turkey day is nearly upon us. And like many, I’ve been more reflective this week of the things I’m thankful for. But I have to ask: why do we only focus our energy looking for the positive one day a year? Did you know there are many benefits to being thankful each and every day?

I’ve been reading The Happiness Advantage by Shawn Achor, a Harvard psychologist who studies happiness. It turns out that happy people are more successful. This is in contrast to the conclusion many of us make, which is that successful people are more happy.

So why does happiness lead to success? People who are happier have an advantage when it comes to assessing new situations. They look for the good, and often see opportunities that are missed by the more pessimistic among us. Our brains get very good at spotting patterns. So if you always look for the worst in every situation, your brain will skip right over a possible advantage. But the good news is happiness can be learned. If you want to teach your brain to find good things, look for good things in your every day life. One recommendation the author makes is to name three things you are happy about (or grateful for) every day, no matter how small. Today I am grateful for:

  1. Coffee with heavy cream.
  2. My kids making each other laugh over breakfast.
  3. Getting to talk with my mom on the phone.

So why wait until Thursday? Start right now and leave me a message in the comments: What are you thankful for?

 

Happy Thanksgiving!

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Disclaimer: This webpage is for general information only. It is not intended to diagnose or treat any medical illness, or give any specific medical advice. Because medical knowlege is constantly evolving, I cannot guarantee the accuracy or timeliness of any information in this blog.

What does liposuction cost?

Let’s talk a little bit about liposuction today. I’ve always loved lipo as a tool to make my patients look great. But now that I’ve experienced it personally, I’m an even bigger fan.

I had lipo of my stomach, hips, inner thighs and knees about three months ago. I was awake for the entire surgery. And if you’re thinking “say what?!”, let me reassure you I will talk about this experience in detail in a future post. But rest assured, you do not have to go under general anesthesia for liposuction. And the results are amazing! I’ve always had that little bit of pudge over my lower abs, and I am happy to report it is completely gone. No more muffin top, which means I’m rocking the hip-hugger jeans for the first time in my life!

But I digress. I promised to talk to you today about what liposuction costs. I’ve talked a little bit about the cost of cosmetic surgery in previous posts, but lets review what’s involved really quickly so you don’t have to link to another post. When you are handed a cost sheet at your surgery consultation, it will likely have the following items on it:

  1. The surgical fee. This is just the portion your surgeon charges.
  2. The facility fee. This is the cost for time at the surgery center or hospital where your surgery will be performed.
  3. The anesthesia fee. If you have surgery awake or just under light sedation, then this won’t apply.
  4. Other add-ons. This may include the cost of implants for a breast augmentation, or scar cream for after surgery.

I don’t know about you, but I hate feeling nickel-and-dimed, so I try to keep my cost sheets pretty all inclusive. This means I include the posteroperative compression garment and the scar cream in the cost, so that you aren’t being asked to pay for add-ons after the fact. The surgical fee, facility fee, and anesthesia fee are all based on the time involved. So liposuction the two variables are patient size (i.e. body mass index, or BMI) and how many areas we’re treating.

  • If your BMI is in the normal range (18.5-25) and we’re treating your stomach and waist, you can expect to pay around $5500. This would obviously be a little less if you didn’t have general anesthesia.
  • If your BMI is higher, say 30-35, then it would be more like $7500 to have your abdomen and waist treated.

Again, these numbers are just generalizations. If you would like a treatment plan personalized to your goals, please call me to schedule a consultation: (440) 974-8577.
You can also check out my website for more liposuction before and after photos.

Talk you to all again soon!

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Disclaimer: This webpage is for general information only. It is not intended to diagnose or treat any medical illness, or give any specific medical advice. Because medical knowlege is constantly evolving, I cannot guarantee the accuracy or timeliness of any information in this blog.

Why did I become a Plastic Surgeon?

If you ever wanted to know why I went into Plastic Surgery, here is your answer! And you actually get to see what I look like and sound like.

 

If you’d like to see more from us at Greer Plastic Surgery, please subscribe to my blog, or check out my website at www.greerplastics.com.

You can also reach us directly at (4400 974-8577.

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Disclaimer: This webpage is for general information only. It is not intended to diagnose or treat any medical illness, or give any specific medical advice. Because medical knowlege is constantly evolving, I cannot guarantee the accuracy or timeliness of any information in this blog.

What is a mastopexy?

A breast lift, or mastopexy, is done to make the breasts more “perky”.  Ptosis is the term used to describe droopiness of the breast, and a mastopexy reverses this process. There are three common types of mastopexy incisions:

  1. Peri-areolar: this type of incision extends only around the areola. It may even be limited to just the upper portion of the areola if only a small crescent of skin needs to be removed (below, left).
  2. Lollipop: A lollipop incision will correct a greater amount of ptosis than a peri-areolar incision. This type of incision starts around the nipple, then extends down the front of the breast (below, center).
  3. Anchor-style incision: identical to the incision used in breast reduction, an anchor-style incision is essentially a lollipop incision with a horizontal incision in the crease below the breast. This will correct even very severe ptosis (below, right).

Photo credit: www.plasticsurgery.org

Picture

Picture

Picture

A small amount of breast tissue may be removed during a mastopexy to help reshape the breast mound, but this does not generally result in a visibly smaller breast.

Recovery after mastopexy is very similar to recovery after a breast reduction. Most of my patients take prescription pain medicine for the first 2 or 3 days, then transition over to ibuprofen or Tylenol. I also recommend no lifting >15lbs and no vigorous exercise during the first four weeks to allow your incisions to heal. The majority of my patients return to work within a few days unless their job requires intense physical activity.

Do you have a question about mastopexy? I will do my best to answer questions in the comments section.

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Disclaimer: This webpage is for general information only. It is not intended to diagnose or treat any medical illness, or give any specific medical advice. Because medical knowlege is constantly evolving, I cannot guarantee the accuracy or timeliness of any information in this blog.

Is there a way to prevent skin cancer?

I think we all understand that skin cancer is caused by sun exposure, and that the best prevention is using sunscreen.  But what if you’ve missed the boat on that option? Every day I see patients in their 40s, 50s and older who have already been subjected to many years of sun damage. Wearing sunscreen moving forward is certainly important, but is there a way to improve some of the damage that’s already been done? Thankfully there is.

Topical retinoids may help reduce chronic sun damage. I’ve covered how to use these products in a previous post, so we’ll skip over that here. Two other options are also effective:

  1. Skin resurfacing. Skin resurfacing includes treatments such as dermabrasion, laser peels and chemical peels. These treatments remove the outer layers of the skin, which is where most of the sun-damaged cells reside.
    Pros:

    1. Skin resurfacing will improve fine lines and pigmentation as well as reduce the risk of skin cancer.
    2. The recovery time is only about a week, and these procedures can be done in the office.
      Cons: Skin resurfacing is usually considered cosmetic, and thus is not covered by insurance.
  2. Topical medication. Efudex (fluorouracil) is actually a chemotherapy drug used to treat cancer, which was formulated into a skin cream. It kills abnormal cells, such as those at risk of turning into skin cancer. The medication is used for a few weeks until most of the abnormal cells have been killed.
    Pros:

    1. Efudex is covered by most insurance plans.
    2. Efudex will remove sun-damaged cells that are not visible to the naked eye.
      Cons: Efudex causes skin irritation, rash, and redness, which may persist for up to two months after you stop the treatment.  No makeup can be worn during the treatment period. The photo below is what a typical patient looks like during treatment.

      Side effects of Efudex. From: http://alaneg1948.blogspot.com/2012_05_01_archive.html

      Side effects of Efudex. From: http://alaneg1948.blogspot.com/2012_05_01_archive.html

 

If you are interested in pursuing Efudex or skin resurfacing, I would recommend seeing a board-certified Plastic Surgeon or Dermatologist in your area who has experience treating skin cancer with both of these treatment options.

 

Questions? Leave them in the comments section and I’ll do my best to get back to you.

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Disclaimer: This webpage is for general information only. It is not intended to diagnose or treat any medical illness, or give any specific medical advice. Because medical knowlege is constantly evolving, I cannot guarantee the accuracy or timeliness of any information in this blog.