Can I Have a Tummy Tuck if I’m Overweight?

This is a very common question; the ideal candidate for a tummy tuck (abdominoplasty) is at his or her goal weight and has minimal fat under the skin. But even someone who isn’t an “ideal” candidate can benefit from an abdominoplasty.

shutterstock.com

shutterstock.com

If you are thinking about abdominoplasty, first ask yourself: would you like to lose weight, or are you happy at your current weight?

  • Planning to lose weight: If you are planning to lose more than about 10-15lbs, I recommend doing this prior to having surgery, as losing this much weight after surgery could result in having excess skin over your stomach, diminishing your surgical results.
  • Comfortable at your current weight: If this is the case, you may still achieve a significant benefit from abdominoplasty, depending on the amount of excess skin you have, and how much fat is under the skin (subcutaneous fat).  Having too much subcutaneous fat can result in poor healing. During your consultation, your surgeon will examine your abdomen to see how much subcutaneous fat you have.

Apart from the actual results of the surgery itself, keep in mind that risks of surgery increase as weight (represented by BMI) increases. Numerous studies have shown an increase in problems with wound healing in patients with high BMI. This increased risk occurs along a gradient, so there is no hard and fast weight over which surgery is too risky. But having a BMI over 30-35 kg/m2 does seem to be associated with a higher risk. Your BMI is based on height and weight, and is easy to calculate.

As always, if you are considering cosmetic surgery, I recommend seeing a surgeon board-certified by the American Board of Plastic Surgery.

Do you have any questions about abdominoplasty? We would love to hear them!

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Disclaimer: This webpage is for general information only. It is not intended to diagnose or treat any medical illness, or give any specific medical advice. Because medical knowlege is constantly evolving, I cannot guarantee the accuracy or timeliness of any information in this blog.

Does the no!no! actually work?

Disclaimer: I have no actual personal experience with the no!no! The information in this blog is based on my knowledge of laser hair removal, the no!no! website, and the articles published in peer-reviewed journals regarding the no!no!.

nono

We perform quite a bit of laser hair removal in my office, and I have to admit that those ads for the no!no! have piqued my curiosity.  So I went to their website and did a little research.  The no!no! actually works very differently from laser hair removal. Laser hair removal uses a specific wavelength of light which is picked up by the pigment in hair. This heats the hair follicle and damages it, preventing it from growing a new hair in the future. In contrast, no!no! uses a filament to heat the hair directly, in essence burning it off. As I mentioned before, I haven’t tried the no!no! myself, but from this description it probably is fairly effective in the short term. But the studies done on no!no! did not determine whether this hair removal is permanent.  Based on the website description, hair may regrow if you stop treatment. You have to do the treatments twice a week for the first two months, then once a week for another month, then as needed. This sounds fairly time intensive compared to laser hair removal, which generally only requires 6-12 treatments total.  I was skeptical before reading about the no!no! Afterwards, I think it could be worth a try, but you may find it to be more trouble than it’s worth.

 

Do you have any personal experience with the no!no!? We’d love to hear about it!

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Disclaimer: This webpage is for general information only. It is not intended to diagnose or treat any medical illness, or give any specific medical advice. Because medical knowlege is constantly evolving, I cannot guarantee the accuracy or timeliness of any information in this blog.

How to Get Rid of Spider Veins Around the Nose

Spider veins, known as telangiestasias, are small blood vessels near the surface of the skin. they are more common in women, and frequently appear around the nose, cheeks, and chin. Spider veins often appear spontaneously, but may also be associated with trauma to the skin, or conditions such as rosacea.

Photo Credit: WebMD.com

Photo Credit: WebMD.com

Spider veins do not cause any symptoms, but they are unsightly, making the skin appear flushed or sunburned. There are no medications to treat spider veins, but a simple in-office procedure can effectively reduce their appearance.

In this procedure, a laser is used to heat the veins up, essentially scarring them shut. In our office we apply numbing cream prior to the procedure and use a special fan that blows super cooled air to minimize any discomfort during the procedure. Afterward there is frequently some bruising that takes up to two weeks to fade, so you should avoid scheduling a treatment right before any special events.  Most people need two or three treatments for maximum improvement, but you will see a noticeable difference after the first treatment.

In addition to bruising, other risks of laser treatment for spider veins include scabbing and scarring. Seeing a practitioner who is experienced with the laser treatment of spider veins can help minimize this risk.

Unfortunately laser treatment of spider veins is not covered by insurance; the charge varies by physician, but is usually $300-400 for a half hour treatment session.

 

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Disclaimer: This webpage is for general information only. It is not intended to diagnose or treat any medical illness, or give any specific medical advice. Because medical knowlege is constantly evolving, I cannot guarantee the accuracy or timeliness of any information in this blog.

Can Surgery Give Me a Thigh Gap?

The thigh gap has entered the news again this week, after Urban Outfitters was ordered by a British advertising standards group to remove a lingerie ad featuring a model that was described as “unhealthily thin“.

Urban Outfitters ad showing a thigh gap

Urban Outfitters ad showing a thigh gap

If you have been out of touch with this issue, a thigh gap is defined as “a space between the inner thighs when standing upright with knees touching” (Wikipedia.com).  It is considered a marker for female attractiveness by some, and searching for “thigh gap” on the internet will result in numerous links to pages giving advice on how to obtain those elusive thin thighs.

Our question today: can surgery give you a thigh gap?  But the more important question: should you even care about the thigh gap?

We’ll tackle the first question quickly, since this is, after all, a blog about Plastic Surgery.  The inner thigh is an area that tends to have a significant amount of fat under the skin, especially in women. Liposuction in this area may result in a space between the thighs in some individuals. And that last part is key: some individuals. Which leads us back around to the second question. Thigh gaps are really just a result of the way you’re built. Sure, losing weight may help if you’re overweight. But there are plenty of women out there who are at a healthy weight according to their BMI, and who will never have a thigh gap. See the photo below for a great example of this: this woman is fit and healthy, but she doesn’t have a thigh gap.

shutterstock.com

shutterstock.com

Unless your body is built in a very specific way (wide-set hips and thin thighs), wishing to have a thigh gap is about as helpful as wishing to be taller. Rather than focusing on one specific body area, focus on how you feel as a whole. You’ll get more out of life being fit, healthy and active than the small and temporary satisfaction you may glean from having thighs that don’t touch.

 

 

What do you think about the thigh gap obesssion? We’d love to hear from you in our comments!

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Disclaimer: This webpage is for general information only. It is not intended to diagnose or treat any medical illness, or give any specific medical advice. Because medical knowlege is constantly evolving, I cannot guarantee the accuracy or timeliness of any information in this blog.