Are Botox Parties Safe?

Botox parties have been fairly common for several years, and don’t seem to be losing popularity any time soon.  The term “Botox Party” generally refers to an event that is set up as a social gathering at a salon, spa, or even an individual’s home.  A physician is then available to administer Botox or fillers. Sounds like a fun way to get some Botox, right?  Well… not so fast.  There are a few things you should be aware of before attending one of these events.

photo courtesy of shutterstock.com

photo courtesy of shutterstock.com

Now, just so you know where I’m coming from, I generally try to base my opinions on a combination of personal experience and literature in peer-reviewed journals.  In addition, I also refer to the guidance of the American Society of Plastic Surgery (www.plasticsurgery.org).  In this instance, they have have released a policy statement on the administration of botulinum toxin.  This statement covers complications, patient selection, and ethical considerations.  It also refers specifically to “Botox Parties”.   The information given below is summarized from this policy statement.

First, be aware that peer pressure may be a factor.  If several of your friends have had Botox, and are urging you to try it too, this doesn’t exactly give you an opportunity to think about the risks and benefits and make an informed decision.  Second, alcohol may be served at these events, which can certainly affect decision-making.  Third, a “party-like” setting does not necessarily maintain the level of privacy that you deserve when receiving a medical treatment.  I always take a full medical history prior to administering Botox, and it can be difficult to complete this in a group setting, even if a private area is available for more individualized attention.  Finally, the injection of Botox is a medical procedure.  It is important that it be done in a clinical setting where there is personnel and equipment to manage any complications or side effects.

For these reasons, I recommend only receiving Botox in a doctor’s office.

 

Related Articles:

Disclaimer: This webpage is for general information only. It is not intended to diagnose or treat any medical illness, or give any specific medical advice. Because medical knowlege is constantly evolving, I cannot guarantee the accuracy or timeliness of any information in this blog.

How Much Does Plastic Surgery Cost?

Patients email and call us daily asking about the cost of a treatment.  My staff does have price lists for some procedures, including laser hair removal and Botox, but they are instructed to give very generalized answers regarding laser treatments and surgical procedures.  I realize that it can be very frustrating for a prospective patient to ask a straightforward question and receive a complicated answer, but there are some very good reasons for this.

courtesy of office.com

courtesy of office.com

First off, the procedure you are asking about may not actually be the best procedure to achieve your goals.  For example, many times I will have patients ask about Botox, when what they actually need is filler.  Second, a patient may not really understand the side effects and downtime of a procedure.  Knowing that you’ll have a week of redness and flaking after a laser peel is just as important as knowing the cost.  In addition, it may take several treatments to achieve the result you are looking for, and this is important to know.  Finally, you may not actually be a candidate for a particular procedure.  Previous surgical history, medical history, and the medications you take are all important for me to know before I recommend a specific treatment, and this is more information than we generally get over the phone.  My recommendation to you is to read up on the procedure(s) you are interested in.  The website of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons, has wonderful information about a variety of procedures.  If you have done some reading and are still interested in a procedure, schedule a consultation.  Our office offers free consultations for Botox, fillers, and laser procedures.  And if you’re thinking of something more involved, the consult fee is well-worth it.  At the consultation visit you’ll receive a detailed cost sheet which includes the hospital costs, surgical fees, and any other potential added costs.  In addition, if you do schedule surgery, the consult fee is deducted from the cost of the surgery.

Related Articles:

Disclaimer: This webpage is for general information only. It is not intended to diagnose or treat any medical illness, or give any specific medical advice. Because medical knowlege is constantly evolving, I cannot guarantee the accuracy or timeliness of any information in this blog.