My Favorite Products Under $30

Most people have their go-to products- brands or specific products which they have been loyal to for years.  And I’m no different.  But I’d like to think I have a unique perspective, which I suppose is why you all read this blog.  So here are some of my favorite products, medical or otherwise.

 

  • Eucerin – The very heavy Eucerin that comes in the jar is some of my favorite Eucerinmoisturizer.  We used this stuff by the gallon in the burn unit, because it’s so great for moisturizing dry, damaged skin.  I love it in the winter on my elbows and knees, and sometimes even my face.

 

  • Kelo-cote – I’ve recommended this in previous posts on wound care for two simple kelocotereasons: it’s affordable, and it works.  Kelo-cote is a silicone scar product that comes in gel or as a reusable sheets.  We don’t know exactly why silicone helps scars, but it really does work.  You can certainly buy more expensive products than Kelo-cote with all sorts of fancy growth factors added, but I find that regular silicone works just fine.

 

  • Aquaphor or Vaseline – If you read that post on improving scars, you know I aquaphorrecommend keeping wounds moist.  Letting a wound dry out and scab up actually slows healing.  But using antibiotic ointment such as Neosporin for weeks on end can lead to allergic reactions and redness that might be confused with an infection.  And after the first few days, antibiotic ointments are unlikely to prevent an infection anyway.  I have all my patients use Vaseline or Aquaphor on incisions after the first week to keep them moist without the risk of an allergic reaction.  They also work great on chapped lips, dry cuticles, or anywhere you need an extra boost of moisture.

 

  • Silicone finger sleeves – These little babies are finger sleevesweet for any type of finger injury that needs sturdier protection than a Band-Aid can provide, or to bring down the swelling in a finger. They are lined with silicone, so they help flatten scars, and they slowly release mineral oil to keep things moist- two of my favorite things combined!  They are also great for toes that rub together inside your shoes.  Buy these in your favorite drugstore in the foot-care aisle.


Do you have any products you absolutely love?

 

 

 

 

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Disclaimer: This webpage is for general information only. It is not intended to diagnose or treat any medical illness, or give any specific medical advice. Because medical knowlege is constantly evolving, I cannot guarantee the accuracy or timeliness of any information in this blog.

Combining Operations is Not Always a Great Idea….

Let’s say you’re already having surgery, so why not combine it with a cosmetic procedure and save some time and possibly some money?  Today we’re going to talk about when this does, and does not work.

Image courtesy of office.com

Image courtesy of office.com

Many procedures can be combined, and it often makes sense to do so.  Having breast implants done at the same time as an abdominoplasty means going under anesthesia one time, and a single recovery period off work.  Combining a gynecological procedure such as a hysterectomy with an abdominoplasty would seem to make sense as well- the incisions are even in the same place.  But having a hysterectomy at the same time as a tummy tuck is definitely a bad idea.  Undergoing an abdominoplasty carries an increased risk of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) for several reasons; first, it is a major operation, and patients are not moving around normally in the days after surgery, which increases the risk of blood clots.  Second, tightening the stomach muscles slows the blood draining from the legs because of increased pressure in the abdomen.  The risk of a clot is overall very low, but these clots in your legs can sometimes travel up to your lungs, where they are known as a pulmonary embolism, a condition which can be fatal.  Having a hysterectomy also increases the risk of DVT; not only are patients sedentary after surgery, but some of the large veins in the pelvis that drain the lower half of the body may not be functioning after this type of surgery.  So combining these two procedures results in a higher risk of DVT than either procedure alone.  Trying to save some time and money is just not worth the increased risk of developing a possibly fatal blood clot.

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Disclaimer: This webpage is for general information only. It is not intended to diagnose or treat any medical illness, or give any specific medical advice. Because medical knowlege is constantly evolving, I cannot guarantee the accuracy or timeliness of any information in this blog.

Happy Valentine’s Day!

I’ll admit it- I really have no great surgery-related topic for today.  But I did want to recognize the holiday, even if it does seem a bit commercialized and artificial.  I myself have no particularly glamorous Valentine’s Day plans- I have a dentist appointment this afternoon, and then we’re getting Thai food tonight.  Crazy noodles are my idea of excitement, so you can see I’m really living on the edge.

I hope this Valentine’s Day gives you a chance to do something nice for yourself or someone you love.  And if there are any topics you would like to hear about- drop me a line in the comments section.

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Disclaimer: This webpage is for general information only. It is not intended to diagnose or treat any medical illness, or give any specific medical advice. Because medical knowlege is constantly evolving, I cannot guarantee the accuracy or timeliness of any information in this blog.

It’s Never Really a Spider Bite…

I realize the title to this post is somewhat cryptic.  This is a day where I talk about a less glamorous part of Plastic Surgery.  Welcome to the wound care side, my friends.  Remember that Plastic Surgeons are, after all, the tissue experts.  This is why we can manipulate skin and cartilage to make a better nose, and why we can move a stomach muscle up to make a new breast.  It’s also what makes us the wound care experts.  If other surgeons have a wound they can’t close, they call a Plastic Surgeon.

office.com

office.com

All General Surgeons deal with generalized skin infections, ranging from a localized abscess to the widely publicized “flesh-eating bacteria” (necrotizing fasciitis).  So any physician who did a year of general surgery (which is most surgical specialties, by the way) will tell you: if a patient thinks he or she has a spider bite, it’s never really a spider.  Unless of course the patient saw the actual spider, which very rarely happens.  What a “spider bite” virtually always turns out to be is a staphylococcus infection, causing a cellulitis and possibly an abscess.  It may start from a microscopic break in the skin, or an inflammation of a hair follicle.  Because there is no cut or injury the person remembers, he or she chalks it up to a spider bite.

So what should you do if this happens to you?  First, clean the area thoroughly with soap and water.  Then take a permanent marker and outline where the redness stops.  If the affected area is on an arm or a leg, elevating it and wrapping it gently with an ACE can help the swelling.  Cleansing it gently twice a day with soap and water, and applying antibiotic ointment such as neosporin or polysporin may help.  Here’s when to see a doctor:

  • the redness spreads outside the mark you drew
  • you have drainage that looks like pus
  • the area isn’t getting better over 2-3 days

And here is when you should go to the emergency room:

  • redness spreading outside the mark you drew within a matter of hours
  • you have a fever of 101 or higher
  • you have pain and tenderness outside the red area

So do people ever get bitten by a an actual spider?  Absolutely.  Here in the midwest, it’s usually a Brown Recluse.  These bites can lead to nasty wounds, so these patients are often referred to – you guessed it – Plastic Surgeons.

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Disclaimer: This webpage is for general information only. It is not intended to diagnose or treat any medical illness, or give any specific medical advice. Because medical knowlege is constantly evolving, I cannot guarantee the accuracy or timeliness of any information in this blog.